There's More to Testing

We're often schooled that tests set us up for our testimony, but what if there was even more beauty to measure?

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// "Consider it pure joy, my brothers and sisters, whenever you face trials of many kinds, because you know that the testing of your faith produces perseverance. Let perseverance finish its work so that you may be mature and complete, not lacking anything." -James 1:2-4 //

I strongly believe that out tests produce our testimony.  James makes it clear that facing trials allows us to produce perseverance, which ultimately matures us.

I know that, for me, I've grown from each test because I've made mistakes, I've hurt, I've been hurt, and I've learned how to properly adjust my worldview deeper into His Truth so that I'm pushing towards that mature completeness.

And what else?  What else can we glean from trials in life?  Is there even more beautiful Truth that we can extract in worship to Jesus?

I'm reading a beautiful book that Brooke Ligertwood recommended called Anonymous by Alicia Britt Chole, and a quote from Chapter 4 really made me ponder this yesterday:

"I feel that trials do not prepare us for what's to come as much as they reveal what we've done with our lives up to this point."

Is this in conflict with James 1?  No.  I actually think it shows a cyclical thinking that works together in a really beautiful way, and one we may not ponder enough to praise Jesus for.

Yes, our tests produce further maturation if we allow them to. But we could just as easily be foolish and not learn a thing from the trials in our life. Blame God. Blame others. Not accept responsibility, whatever amount we might have.

What if, the next time we faced a trial, we were intentional to think of not only how we might have opportunity to grow in Christ, but to also consider how we have grown from prior tests similar in nature and create a monumental moment of praise for the beautiful work He has done in us thus far?

Perhaps it would do us well to not only strive forward in Christ but to also worship the works He has done in us for His glory and eternity.

Michael Tatonetti